Most Recent Photos

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Wheeling Suspension Bridge, Wheeling, West Virginia

    The Wheeling Suspension Bridge, consructed by Charles Ellet, Jr. between 1846 and 1849, was the first long-span wire-cable suspension bridge in the United States. For many years it was the longest clear-span bridge in the world. The deck was wrecked by a violent storm in 1854. It was re-built and the structure with its original towers and cables is still in service. It is the most significant remaining pre-Civil War bridge in the nation.

  • Wheeling Suspension Bridge, Wheeling, West Virginia

    The Wheeling Suspension Bridge, consructed by Charles Ellet, Jr. between 1846 and 1849, was the first long-span wire-cable suspension bridge in the United States. For many years it was the longest clear-span bridge in the world. The deck was wrecked by a violent storm in 1854. It was re-built and the structure with its original towers and cables is still in service. It is the most significant remaining pre-Civil War bridge in the nation.

  • Wheeling Suspension Bridge, Wheeling, West Virginia

    The Wheeling Suspension Bridge, consructed by Charles Ellet, Jr. between 1846 and 1849, was the first long-span wire-cable suspension bridge in the United States. For many years it was the longest clear-span bridge in the world. The deck was wrecked by a violent storm in 1854. It was re-built and the structure with its original towers and cables is still in service. It is the most significant remaining pre-Civil War bridge in the nation.

  • Historical Mural, Reynoldsburg, Ohio

    Mural Artist: Curtis Goldstein

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    "The National Road completed by the Federal Government to this point in 1839. From this point westward built by the states through which it passes." The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    "Three miles southwest of here General George Rogers Clark commanding Kentucky frontiersmen vanquished the Shawnee Confederacy August 8, 1780 resulting in opening the Northwest Territory." The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Clark County, Ohio

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was the first one to be unveiled and it was dedicated on July 4, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Ohio County, West Virginia

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was dedicated on July 7, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Ohio County, West Virginia

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was dedicated on July 7, 1928.

  • Madonna of the Trail Monument, Ohio County, West Virginia

    The Madonna of the Trail statues were created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1928 and 1929. The monument was conceived by Arlene B. Moss of St. Louis, Missouri and sculpted by August Leimbach. Identical monuments were placed along the transcontinental National Road in each of the 12 states through wiich it passed, from Maryland to California. This Madonna of the Trail monument was dedicated on July 7, 1928.

  • Bear's Mill, Darke County, Ohio

    Since 1849, Buhr Stoneground Flours & Meals, Powered by Water; on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Annie Oakley Historical Sign, Darke County, Ohio

    Annie Oakley Park, Greenville: Annie Oakley, 1860-1926, "Little Sure Shot" - One of America's best-known sport shooters and entertainers of the late 1800s, Annie Oakley was born Phoebe Ann Mosey (or Mozee) north of Versailles in Darke County in 1860. She achieved local fame for her shooting ability as a hunter while still in her teens. By 1885 Oakley was a star performer in Buffalo Bill's Wild West. With husband and manager Frank Butler, she refined a shooting act and image that appealed to late 19th century notions of a romanticized but vanishing West. Throughout her 30-year performing career, Oakley provided honest entertainment in a deception-prone industry while demonstrating widening opportunities for women. She retained her Ohio ties throughout her life and is interred at Brock Cemetery, eleven miles north of Greenville.

  • Annie Oakley Statue, Darke County, Ohio

    Annie Oakley Park, Greenville

  • Annie Oakley Plaque, Darke County, Ohio

    Annie Oakley Park, Greenville

  • Annie Oakley Barn Mural, Darke County, Ohio

    Barn Artist Scott Hagan's Annie Oakley Mural: "Aim at a high mark and you'll hit it."

  • Annie Oakley's Birthplace, Darke County, Ohio

    World famous sharpshooter Annie Oakley was born Phoebe Ann Moses August 13, 1860 in a log cabin 1,028 feet due east of here on land that had been in the Swallow family line for 127 years at the time this memorial was dedicated in July 1981 by the Annie Oakley Committee, Inc.

  • Annie Oakley's Birthplace, Darke County, Ohio

    World famous sharpshooter Annie Oakley was born Phoebe Ann Moses August 13, 1860 in a log cabin 1,028 feet due east of here on land that had been in the Swallow family line for 127 years at the time this memorial was dedicated in July 1981 by the Annie Oakley Committee, Inc.

  • Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs. In 1865 the farm was purchased by George Washington van Brunt, whose initials, “G.W.V.B.” and the date, “1874”, can be seen on the westernmost building in marble."

  • Windows of Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

  • Windows of Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

  • Smokehouse and Outhouse, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs. In 1865 the farm was purchased by George Washington van Brunt, whose initials, “G.W.V.B.” and the date, “1874”, can be seen on the westernmost building in marble."

  • Door of Limestone Dairy Building, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs. In 1865 the farm was purchased by George Washington van Brunt, whose initials, “G.W.V.B.” and the date, “1874”, can be seen on the westernmost building in marble."

  • Limestone Dairy Building, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs. In 1865 the farm was purchased by George Washington van Brunt, whose initials, “G.W.V.B.” and the date, “1874”, can be seen on the westernmost building in marble."

  • Windows of Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

  • Windows of Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

  • Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

  • Door of Carriage House & Chapel, Waukesha County, Wisconsin

    Elisha Edgerton Farm - The Carriage House had a small Episcopal chapel on the upper floor, where services were held for early settlers. According to "The Heritage Guidebook" by Russell Zimmerman, "This complex of buildings is all that survives of a great “Wisconsin premium” farm which was built by Edgerton on land that he settled in 1836. The small Gothic Revival carriage house, built in 1856, is made of limestone and trimmed with carved wooden window casings and bargeboards. Episcopal services were once held in a chapel upstairs."

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