Most Recent Photos

  • Missouri Theater, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Missouri Theater, designed by the Boller Brothers, with sculptural work designed and created by Waylande Gregory, is a historic masterpiece. The theater opened in June of 1927 as a 1,200 seat movie house, showing the first feature film "Rough House Rosie, a silent film that cost patrons $.25 admission. The City of St. Joseph purchased the theater in 1978 for the purpose of transforming it into a performing arts center. In 1979, the Missouri Theater was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Twin Spires Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri

    Built in 1908, this Gothic Revival church was the third church built for the Church of the Immaculate Conception, a German national parish organized in 1860. The parish was closed by the Diocese of Kansas City—St. Joseph in 1992. The property was deeded over to a not-for-profit group and re-named “Twin Spires”. The organization assembled a religious history museum and undertook restoration of the property.

  • Twin Spires Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri

    Built in 1908, this Gothic Revival church was the third church built for the Church of the Immaculate Conception, a German national parish organized in 1860. The parish was closed by the Diocese of Kansas City—St. Joseph in 1992. The property was deeded over to a not-for-profit group and re-named “Twin Spires”. The organization assembled a religious history museum and undertook restoration of the property.

  • Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, 1906, Petersburg, Iowa

    Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, 1906, Petersburg, Iowa

  • Plaque for Patee House Hotel, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Patee House, also known as Patee House Museum, was completed in 1858 as a 140-room luxury hotel. It was one of the best-known hotels west of the Mississippi River. It served as the headquarters for the Pony Express as well as the Provost Marshal’s office for the Union Army during the Civil War. Restoration of the front portico was a 1976 Bicentennial project. Mrs. William J. Bingham, great granddaughter of John Patee (who built the Patee House), contributed to the restoration in memory of her father, Harry Patee, grandson of John Patee.

  • Patee House and Pony Express Office, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Patee House, also known as Patee House Museum, was completed in 1858 as a 140-room luxury hotel. It was one of the best-known hotels west of the Mississippi River. It served as the headquarters for the Pony Express as well as the Provost Marshal’s office for the Union Army during the Civil War. In 1965, it was designated as a National Historic Landmark for its role as the Pony Express headquarters. It marks the eastern terminus of the Pony Express National Historic Trail. It is also on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Patee House and Jesse James Home, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Patee House, also known as Patee House Museum, was completed in 1858 as a 140-room luxury hotel. It was one of the best-known hotels west of the Mississippi River.After outlaw Jesse James was killed in 1882 at his nearby home, his surviving family stayed at the hotel during the investigation of his death. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark for its role as the Pony Express headquarters. It marks the eastern terminus of the Pony Express National Historic Trail. The Jesse James Home Museum is located on Patee House grounds. Both buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places and the Patee House is a National Historic Landmark.

  • Jesse James Home, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Jesse James Home Museum is the house in St. Joseph, Missouri where outlaw Jesse James was living and was gunned down on April 3, 1882, by Robert Ford. It is a one-story, Greek Revival style frame dwelling built in 1880. It is on the National Register of Historic Places. The investigation into the shooting death of James was conducted at Patee House Hotel. Mrs. James, her two children, and Jesse's mother stayed in Patee House for two nights after Jesse James was killed.

  • Cupola of Patee House, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Patee House, also known as Patee House Museum, was completed in 1858 as a 140-room luxury hotel. It was one of the best-known hotels west of the Mississippi River. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark for its role as the Pony Express headquarters. It marks the eastern terminus of the Pony Express National Historic Trail. It is a National Historic Landmark and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • Pony Express Stables, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The The Pony Express Stable, known as the Pike's Peak Stable, was built in 1858 to accommodate horses used by the local freight and stagecoach company. In 1860, the Central Overland California and Pike's Peak Express Company purchased the building for the Pony Express, to serve the same purpose. The original wooden structure was replaced by a brick building in 1888, but some of the original posts and beams were reused. In 1950, the Goetz Foundation restored the building to its 1888 brick appearance and established a museum dedicated to the Pony Express, the Pony Express National Memorial. It documents the history of the Pony Express, the first fast mail line across the North American continent from the Missouri River to the Pacific coast.

  • Pony Express Museum, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Pony Express Museum is a transport museum in Saint Joseph, Missouri, documenting the history of the Pony Express, the first fast mail line across the North American continent from the Missouri River to the Pacific coast. The original building, known as the Pike's Peak Stable, was built in 1858 to accommodate horses used by the local freight and stagecoach company. In 1860, the Central Overland California and Pike's Peak Express Company purchased the building for the Pony Express, to serve the same purpose. The original wooden structure was replaced by a brick building in 1888, but some of the original posts and beams were reused. In 1950, the Goetz Foundation restored the building to its 1888 brick appearance and established a museum dedicated to the Pony Express, the Pony Express National Memorial.

  • Monument to First Pony Express, St. Joseph, Missouri

    This monument erected by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the City of St. Joseph marks the place where the first Pony Express started on April 3, 1860. Erected 1912.

  • Pony Express Plaque, St. Joseph, Missouri

    120 celebrated riders rode 650,000 miles with only one rider killed by Indians, one schedule not completed and one mail lost.

  • C.D. Smith Drug Co Building, St. Joseph, Missouri

    On January 1, 1887, C. D. Smith and his brother Samuel I. Smith opened a wholesale drug supply house, and in 1888 built this large building. When the business started, it carried about a thousand different items. This gradually expanded to about twenty thousand items. Salesmen covered the states of Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, and Nebraska.

  • Hickory Theatre, St. Joseph, Missouri

    The Hickory Theatre opened in September 1923, showing the silent films "Without Compromise" with Willian Farnum and “Tess of Storm Country” with Mary Pickford. It was closed on May 5, 1958 with Audie Murphy in “The Quiet American” & Pamela Duncan in “Gun Battle at Monterey”. Also known as Hickory Hal.

  • Pioneer Mural, St. Joseph, Missouri

    Muralist Sam Welty's "Queen of the River Towns, King of the Trails" mural depicts the city’s cornerstone prominence as the “Gateway to the West” during westward expansion. The image of wagon trains and settlers covers the backside of six buildings spanning a city block and at several points exceeds 100 feet in height.

  • Pioneer Mural, St. Joseph, Missouri

    Muralist Sam Welty's "Queen of the River Towns, King of the Trails" mural depicts the city’s cornerstone prominence as the “Gateway to the West” during westward expansion. The image of wagon trains and settlers covers the backside of six buildings spanning a city block and at several points exceeds 100 feet in height.

Powered by SmugMug Owner Log In